By Jessie Funchion, MS, RD, LDN

Ever feel like you are “so good” during the week, only to “blow it” on the weekend? Weekend eating accounts for 30% of our meals (Friday night to Sunday Night – 7/21 meals), and can really make or break someone’s progress with weight loss. Here are a few tips for improving weekend eating:

1) Stay consistent.
Make your weekend eating look like your weekday eating (for at least two out of meals). If Monday through Friday you’re eating oatmeal for breakfast, a soup/salad combo for lunch, and a home cooked dinner, try to make your weekend look as similar to that as possible, at least for two of those meals. Then if you have a little fun for that third meal, at least the rest of your day looks good.

2) Stay Accountable.
Some ideas…
· Weigh yourself on Friday morning and again on Monday morning
· Continue food journaling throughout the weekend
· Use the buddy system. Find a friend or family member to engage in some healthy behavior with you – maybe going for a job on Saturday or meal prepping together on Sunday afternoon.

3) Watch the clock.
Hopefully you get to sleep in a bit on the weekends, so chances are you won’t be having breakfast at 7:00am like you might during the work-week. That’s OK! But, whenever you do have your first meal, check the time, and then plan on eating 3-4 hours after that. If you’re going more “Netflix & Chill” with your weekend, this applies to you too! Follow the 3-4 hour rule to prevent yourself from endless grazing.

4) Plan ahead.
If you’re eating every 3-4 hours, you may need to pack some snacks for those busy weekends when you’re out and about. KIND bars, trail mix packets and fresh fruit like apples and pears travel well and are easy to store in the car or your bag, so you don’t find yourself skipping meals and overeating later.

5) Imbibe wisely.
Dry wine, light beer or mixed drinks with seltzer tend to be the lowest-cal options. Enjoy your drink, but if you’ll be out for awhile try alternating an alcoholic drink with a non-alcoholic drink (water, seltzer, unsweetened tea, diet soda). Make sure you eat before heading out! If you have a full belly before the night gets started, you’ll be less likely to snack on bar snacks later.

6) Sweat it out.
If you do find yourself eating (or drinking) a bit more than usual on the weekend, try to compensate by working out a bit harder than usual on those days. Add extra time at the gym, or increase the intensity of your workouts to help burn some additional calories on those days.

Ketogenic Diets Q & A

by Jessie Funchion, MS, RD, LDN

 

What is the Ketogenic Diet?
The ketogenic diet is a high fat, very low-carb diet that has been used in children with epilepsy to help control seizures. Recently, it has become a trendy weight loss diet.

How does it work?
Eating a high fat/low carb diet puts the body in a state of ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic adaptation that has allowed humans to survive on ketones as fuel instead of its regular glucose. Ketones are the result of fat breaking down and can provide energy for the brain when glucose is scarce. Being in a state of ketosis also diminishes cravings and hunger sensations, so it could lead to an overall reduction in food intake.

What foods are allowed on the ketogenic diet?
–       Fats and Oils – Butter, Lard, Coconut Oil, Olive Oil, etc
–       Meat and Poultry
–       Seafood
–       Full fat dairy
–       Nuts and Seeds
–       Certain non-starchy vegetables
–       Beverages – Water, broth, coffee, tea, unsweetened coconut and almond milk

What should are not permitted on the ketogenic diet?
It’s recommended that only 5-10% of calories come from carbohydrates, which depending on calorie intake generally means fewer than 30g of carbohydrates a day. This means sugar, fruit, high sugar and high starch vegetables, and grains should be eliminated or eaten in very small quantities.

Will I lose weight?
Probably. Anyone who follows an elimination diet (whether they eliminate gluten/dairy/fat/carbs etc.) will likely lose weight because they also are reducing calories. You also may feel less hungry as ketosis diminishes hunger sensation, so overeating tends not to be a problem

Will I keep the weight off?
Probably not. The ketogenic diet is a difficult, and arguably ‘unhealthy’, diet (due to the reduced fiber and vitamin/mineral content) that is not recommended for the long term. The best ‘diet’ is the one you can see yourself doing for the rest of your life.

What are some pros and cons of the ketogenic diet?

Pros:

– Probable short-term weight loss
– Diminished feelings of hunger
– Allowed to eat high-fat foods

Cons:

– Difficult to adhere to long-term (which leads to weight regain)
– Low fiber
– Risk of nutrient insufficiencies
– Side effects such as bad smelling breath, low energy, headaches and constipation
– Elevated LDL cholesterol

 

Bottom Line:
The ketogenic diet is not recommended for long-term use (unless it is being used as medical nutrition therapy for an individual with epilepsy). It is likely safe for short-term use for weight loss, but it is recommended to incorporate fruits and whole grains back into the diet once a weight maintenance plan is in place. While following a ketogenic diet, take a multivitamin and mineral supplement that contains adequate B vitamins and magnesium.

 

Sources:
http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/0917p12.shtml

Can Extremely Fat-Restricted or High-Fat Diets be Effective — and Safe — for Weight Loss?